WAFFLE SCONES!

I had a brainstorm this morning – a good one – and I’m passing it on to you.

I was mixing a batch of scones – the extremely easy ones that are made with SELF-RISING FLOUR (or SELF-RAISING Flour if you are in the UK) and heavy cream plus a little sugar – not much, scones should not be sweet like cake.

For this batch I decided to splurge a bit and added a couple of eggs and a little vanilla extract and about a tablespoon of oil (my preference is rice bran oil but any neutral vegetable oil will do) to make them a bit more tender.

The basic recipe is the same as my BISCUITS! recipe,

1 cup heavy cream
2 cups self-rising flour (it should be fresh – after several months the baking powder tends to lose strength but you can add some yourself)

For scones with just a hint of sweetness, add a 1/4 cup of sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract (or other flavor – almond, lemon or orange – with some of the zest grated from the rind)
1 Tablespoon vegetable oil

2 eggs.

Measure out everything.

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, pour the
cream, add the
eggs and the
oil

beat with a whisk to combine

add the sugar and vanilla and beat.

Add one cup of the flour and beat just until it is completely incorporated
add half of the remaining cup and beat until it looks like thick batter

It should hold its shape when mounded up. If not add a little more flour, stir to combine
and add more if it still seems too soft.

Usually at this point we turn the dough out onto a board and knead a bit more flour into it, cut into rounds and bake in the oven.
NOT TODAY, Today I am making waffles from this dough.
VARIATIONS: At this point you can add dried fruits – cranberries, raisins, chopped apricots, dates, figs, etc., to the dough, mixing well.
You can also substitute up to 1/3 the amount of flour with almond flour, other nut flours, coconut flour, and the various “exotic” flours that have become popular in the past few years. Sorghum flour (Bob’s Red Mill sweet white is excellent) is somewhat sweet so cut the sugar by half if using it. You can add finely chopped nuts or thinly sliced almonds but anything in larger chunks tends to stick between the bumps on the grid and pull the waffle apart when the top is opened. (I have experienced this so I know what happens).
My waffle iron is a “vintage” one that has the bare metal grids that need periodic “oiling” and I use the spray stuff.
It’s a regular waffle iron, I don’t care for the Belgian type. And with this treatment, it is virtually non-stick.

I used a “disher” or ice cream scoop – a large one but a serving spoon will work. The one pictured is a Size 8 – holds 4 ounces to the rim, obviously with the dough mounded up, there is probably 6 ounces in each scoop that goes onto the waffler.

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The waffle iron when first turned on (Med/Hot) takes a while to heat up but once hot, stays so until turned off.
Yours may heat faster – and there should be a signal to show when it is hot.

I set my digital timer for 5 minutes.

When the light on the wafflers goes out – that signals it is hot.
I spray both grids – just roughly in the center ALWAYS spray oil when hot –

apply the dough to the center and close the iron and start the timer.

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As soon as it sounds I open the waffler, remove the waffle with tongs to a cooling rack (so they will stay crisp)

The first is a plain one.  The second is one with dried cranberries added to the dough.

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I give both grids a quick oil spritz and apply another batch of dough.

And so on until all the dough has been waffled…

The little “pockets” in these waffle scones are prefect for holding additions such as clotted cream, jam or jelly, whipped butter with honey or maple syrup or whatever you fancy.

And, when completely cool, they can be closed in a zip lock bag and refrigerated for a couple of days or frozen up to four or five weeks and reheated in your toaster or toaster oven.

ENJOY!